How it works ?


Cancer chemotherapy exerts its effect on both malignant and normal cells which have a high mitotic activity.

Rapidly dividing normal cells, that are frequently affected by chemotherapy, include those in the bone marrow, epithelial lining of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, and hair follicles. At any given time, 90% of human hair follicles are in the anagen or actively dividing phase; therefore, it is this large proportion of hair follicles that is susceptible to chemotherapy's deleterious effects.

The hair
                The hair
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Hair loss from chemotherapy occurs either by total atrophy and loss of the hair root bulb or, more frequently, by partial atrophy of the bulb causing constriction of the hair shaft. The hair shaft then breaks off easily with any trauma such as

washing or combing. Alopecia induced by chemotherapy is reversible. Regeneration of hair growth occurs within 1-2 months after discontinuation of therapy.


The skin
                The skin
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The administration of SCS II is based on the principle of scalp hypothermia. Designed to minimize the effect of alopecia, the SCS II system has a dual effect; first it constricts the scalp blood vessels causing vasocinstriction. Secondly,

hypothermia drastically reduces metabolic activity in the scalp area. Damage to follicle cells is minimized and hair loss is significantly reduced or prevented.



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